Management
ARUN HEALTH SAFETY SERVICES
Requirement
Solution Employers     should     take     a     risk-based     approach,     considering     the     type     of equipment   and   what   it   is   being   used   for.   If   it   is   used   regularly   and   moved   a   lot e.g.   a   floor   cleaner   or   a   kettle,   testing   (along   with   visual   checks)   can   be   an important   part   of   an   effective   maintenance   regime   giving   employers   confidence that they are doing what is necessary to help them meet their legal duties.
Solution
Testing
The   Electricity   at   Work   Regulations   1989   require   that   any   electrical   equipment that   has   the   potential   to   cause   injury   is   maintained   in   a   safe   condition.   The   law simply    requires    an    employer    to    ensure    that    their    electrical    equipment    is maintained in order to prevent danger. The    Regulations    do    not    specify    what    needs    to    be    done,    by    whom    or    how frequently   (ie   they   don't   make   inspection   or   testing   of   electrical   appliances   a legal   requirement,   nor   do   they   make   it   a   legal   requirement   to   undertake   this annually). Portable   appliance   testing   (PAT)   is   the   term   used   to   describe   the   examination   of electrical    appliances    and    equipment    to    ensure    they    are    safe    to    use.    Most electrical   safety   defects   can   be   found   by   visual   examination   but   some   types   of defect   can   only   be   found   by   testing.   However,   it   is   essential   to   understand   that visual   examination   is   an   essential   part   of   the   process   because   some   types   of electrical safety defect can't be detected by testing alone. There   is   no   legal   requirement   to   label   equipment   that   has   been   inspected   or tested,   nor   is   there   a   requirement   to   keep   records   of   these   activities.   However,   a record   and   /   or   labelling   can   be   a   useful   management   tool   for   monitoring   and reviewing   the   effectiveness   of   the   maintenance   scheme   –   and   to   demonstrate that a scheme exists.

Risk Assessment

Requirement Recommendations   are   made   for   ‘User   Checks’,      and   ‘Visual   Inspections’   which will identify areas of concern.
AHSS   can   complete   your   risk   assessment   for   you   and   provide   a   detailed   report on it’s findings together with an Action Plan. The inspection will take into consideration the following; Damage   to   the   lead   including   fraying,   cuts   or   heavy   scuffing,   eg   from   floor box covers; damage to the plug, eg to the cover or bent pins; tape applied to the lead to join leads together; coloured   wires   visible   where   the   lead   joins   the   plug   (the   cable   is   not   being gripped where it enters the plug); damage   to   the   outer   cover   of   the   equipment   itself,   including   loose   parts   or screws; signs   of   overheating,   such   as   burn   marks   or   staining   on   the   plug,   lead   or piece of equipment; equipment   that   has   been   used   or   stored   in   unsuitable   conditions,   such   as wet or dusty environments or where water spills are possible; cables trapped under furniture or in floor boxes. Also as part of the visual inspection, consideration will be made regarding; the     electrical     equipment     is     being     used     in     accordance     with     the manufacturer’s instructions; the equipment is suitable for the job; there has been any change of circumstances; the user has reported any issues.
Solution AHSS   has   the   equipment   and   experience   in   providing   PAT.   A   list   of   appliances tested together with labelling the equipment would be part of out service.
Requirement The   Health   &   Safety   Executive   provide   a   Table   with   suggested   initial   intervals   for checking Class 1 and Class 2 portable electrical equipment. Dependent   on   the   risk   assessment   and   the   recommendations   formal   testing with appropriate equipment should be carried out.
There   is   no   legal   requirement   to   label   equipment   that   has   been   inspected   or tested,   nor   is   there   a   requirement   to   keep   records   of   these   activities.   However,   a record   and   /   or   labelling   can   be   a   useful   management   tool   for   monitoring   and reviewing   the   effectiveness   of   the   maintenance   scheme   –   and   to   demonstrate that a scheme exists.

Management

ARUN HEALTH SAFETY SERVICES

Requirement

The   Electricity   at   Work   Regulations   1989   require   that   any   electrical   equipment   that   has the   potential   to   cause   injury   is   maintained   in   a   safe   condition.   The   law   simply   requires an   employer   to   ensure   that   their   electrical   equipment   is   maintained   in   order   to   prevent danger. The   Regulations   do   not   specify   what   needs   to   be   done,   by   whom   or   how   frequently   (ie they   don't   make   inspection   or   testing   of   electrical   appliances   a   legal   requirement,   nor do they make it a legal requirement to undertake this annually). Portable    appliance    testing    (PAT)    is    the    term    used    to    describe    the    examination    of electrical   appliances   and   equipment   to   ensure   they   are   safe   to   use.   Most   electrical safety   defects   can   be   found   by   visual   examination   but   some   types   of   defect   can   only   be found   by   testing.   However,   it   is   essential   to   understand   that   visual   examination   is   an essential   part   of   the   process   because   some   types   of   electrical   safety   defect   can't   be detected by testing alone. There   is   no   legal   requirement   to   label   equipment   that   has   been   inspected   or   tested, nor   is   there   a   requirement   to   keep   records   of   these   activities.   However,   a   record   and   / or    labelling    can    be    a    useful    management    tool    for    monitoring    and    reviewing    the effectiveness of the maintenance scheme – and to demonstrate that a scheme exists.
Solution Employers   should   take   a   risk-based   approach,   considering   the   type   of   equipment   and what   it   is   being   used   for.   If   it   is   used   regularly   and   moved   a   lot   e.g.   a   floor   cleaner   or   a kettle,    testing    (along    with    visual    checks)    can    be    an    important    part    of    an    effective maintenance   regime   giving   employers   confidence   that   they   are   doing   what   is   necessary to help them meet their legal duties.

Risk Assessment

Requirement Recommendations    are    made    for    ‘User    Checks’,    and    ‘Visual    Inspections’    which    will identify areas of concern. Solution AHSS   can   complete   your   risk   assessment   for   you   and   provide   a   detailed   report   on   it’s findings together with an Action Plan. The inspection will take into consideration the following; Damage   to   the   lead   including   fraying,   cuts   or   heavy   scuffing,   eg   from   floor   box covers; damage to the plug, eg to the cover or bent pins; tape applied to the lead to join leads together; coloured   wires   visible   where   the   lead   joins   the   plug   (the   cable   is   not   being gripped where it enters the plug); damage   to   the   outer   cover   of   the   equipment   itself,   including   loose   parts   or screws; signs   of   overheating,   such   as   burn   marks   or   staining   on   the   plug,   lead   or   piece of equipment; equipment   that   has   been   used   or   stored   in   unsuitable   conditions,   such   as   wet or dusty environments or where water spills are possible; cables trapped under furniture or in floor boxes. Also as part of the visual inspection, consideration will be made regarding; the   electrical   equipment   is   being   used   in   accordance   with   the   manufacturer’s instructions; the equipment is suitable for the job; there has been any change of circumstances; the user has reported any issues.
Testing
Requirement The    Health    &    Safety    Executive    provide    a    Table    with    suggested    initial    intervals    for checking Class 1 and Class 2 portable electrical equipment. Dependent    on    the    risk    assessment    and    the    recommendations    formal    testing    with appropriate equipment should be carried out.
Solution AHSS   has   the   equipment   and   experience   in   providing   PAT.   A   list   of   appliances   tested together with labelling the equipment would be part of out service.