Risk Assessments

Management

Policies

Training

Requirement As   part   of   managing   health   and   safety   of   a   business   there   must   be   control   of   the risks   in   the   workplace.   To   achieve   this   there   is   a   need   to   identify   what   might   cause harm   to   people   and   decide   whether   there   has   been   reasonable   steps   to   prevent that   harm.   This   is   known   as   risk   assessment   and   it   is   something   required   by   law   to be   carried   out.   If   you   have   fewer   than   five   employees,   you   don't   have   to   write anything down. Even   though   you   may   be   already   taking   steps   to   protect   your   employees,   a   risk assessment will help decide whether you have covered all you need to. For     some     risks,     other     regulations     require     particular     control     measures.     An assessment   can   help   you   identify   where   you   need   to   look   at   certain   risks   and   any additional control measures in more detail. Solution A   risk   assessment   completed   by   AHSS   will   follow   the   5   Step   methodology,   as required   by   the   Health   and   Safety   Executive,   and   on   completion   will   provide   a detailed report with an Action Plan highlighting any areas requiring attention. Identifying any hazards Advise who might be harmed and how Provide an evaluation of the risks and recommend precautions Record the significant findings Recommend when a review is required
Requirement Organisations   have   a   legal   duty,   defined   by   the   ‘The   Management   of   Health   and Safety    at    Work    Regulations    1999’,    to    put    in    place    suitable    arrangements    to manage health and safety by the control of health and safety risks. In   implementing   arrangements,   organisations   should   consult   with   employees   or their representatives, including trade unions where they are recognised. The   ‘suitable   arrangements’   are   defined   as   a   minimum   having   the   processes   and procedures required to meet the legal requirements. These include; a written health and safety policy (if you employ five or more people); assessments   of   the   risks   to   employees,   contractors,   customers,   partners, and   any   other   people   who   could   be   affected   by   your   activities   –   and record    the    significant    findings    in    writing    (if    you    employ    five    or    more people). Any risk assessment must be ‘suitable and sufficient’; arrangements   for   the   effective   planning,   organisation,   control,   monitoring and   review   of   the   preventive   and   protective   measures   that   come   from risk assessment; access to competent health and safety advice. (AHSS at your service.) providing   employees   with   information   about   the   risks   in   your   workplace and how they are protected;  instruction and training for employees in how to deal with the risks;  ensuring there is adequate and appropriate supervision in place; consulting    with    employees    about    their    risks    at    work    and    current preventive and protective measures Solution . This      ‘Plan,   Do,   Check,   Act’   model   achieves   a   balance   between   the   systems   and behavioural   aspects   of   management.   It   also   treats   health   and   safety   management as   an   integral   part   of   good   management   generally,   rather   than   as   a   stand-alone system. With   the   partnership   of   AHSS   using   the   model   approach   of   managing   health   and safety   all   legal   requirements   can   be   identified   and      ensure   appropriate   suitable arrangements made. AHSS   has   provided   this   service   for   over   ten   years   with   Public   and   Commercial organisations.
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999:  Require employers to carry out risk assessments, make arrangements to implement necessary measures, appoint competent people and arrange for appropriate information and training. Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992: Cover a wide range of basic health, safety and welfare issues such as ventilation, heating, lighting, workstations, seating and welfare facilities. Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992:  Set out requirements for work with Visual Display Units (VDUs) Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992: Require employers to provide appropriate protective clothing and equipment for their employees. Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998:  Require that equipment provided for use at work, including machinery, is safe. Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992:  Cover the moving of objects by hand or bodily force. Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981:  Cover requirements for first aid. The Health and Safety Information for Employees Regulations 1989: Require employers to display a poster telling employees what they need to know about health and safety. Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act 1969:  Require employers to take out insurance against accidents and ill health to their employees. Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995: Require employers to notify certain occupational injuries, diseases and dangerous events.  Noise at Work Regulations 1989: Require employers to take action to protect employees from hearing damage.  Electricity at Work Regulations 1989: Require people in control of electrical systems to ensure they are safe to use and maintained in a safe condition. Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002: Require employers to assess the risks from hazardous substances and take appropriate precautions. In addition, specific regulations cover particular areas, for example asbestos and lead, and: Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 2002: Require suppliers to classify, label and package dangerous chemicals and provide safety data sheets for them. Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994: Cover safe systems of work on construction sites.  Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1994:  Cover safe installation, maintenance and use of gas systems and appliances in domestic and commercial premises. Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1999:  Require those who manufacture, store or transport dangerous chemicals or explosives in certain quantities to notify the relevant authority.  Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002:  Require employers and the self employed to carry out a risk assessment of work activities involving dangerous substances.
Requirement The    first    requirement    of    management    under    the    ‘Plan,    Do,    Check,    Act’ methodology    is    having    a    strategy    and    making    clear    plans    how    to    achieve effective health and safety outcomes. Policies   will   set   a   clear   direction   for   the   organisation   to   follow   and   should   be shared   throughout   the   workforce,   so   that   everyone   understands   how   health   and safety   will   be   managed.   If   your   organisation   has   five   or   more   employees,   that policy must be written down. The   number   and   types   of   Policies   that   an   organisation   requires   depends   on   the type     of     activity     their     workers     are     engaged     in.     Policies     must     cover     the requirements   of   relevant   Regulations.   See   Note   1   for   a   list   of   18   Regulations   that may be required. All   policies   should   be   written   in   consultation   with   the   workforce      and   must   be signed   by   a   person   at   the   top   of   the   organisation   –   the   owner   or   a   director.   Most importantly,   organisations   should   ensure   that   their   actions,   and   those   of   your workers, mirror the statements that have been made. Solution AHSS   have   templates,   that   cover   the   Regulations.   which   after   consultation   can be adaptable to make bespoke policies.
ARUN HEALTH SAFETY SERVICES
Requirement To   comply   with   the   law,   employees   need   to   have   the   skills,   knowledge   and experience    to    carry    out    their    duties    safely.    Organisations    should    take    into account   their   employees’   capabilities,   to   ensure   the   demands   of   the   job   do   not exceed their ability to do the work without risk to themselves or others. Everyone    in    an    organisation    requires    adequate    health    and    safety    training. Training    helps    people    gain    the    skills    and    knowledge,    and    ultimately    the competence, to carry out their work safely and without risk to their health. Employees   must   be   given   information   about   the   risks   involved   in   their   work,   and the   steps   that   need   to   be   taken   to   reduce   or   remove   those   risks.   Where   training is   particularly   important   There   are   situations   where   health   and   safety   training   is particularly important, for example: ■ when people are new to the job; ■ on exposure to new or increased risks; ■ where existing skills may have become rusty or need updating.
Solution With   years   of   experience   training   and   teaching   AHSS   can   provide   courses   suitable to cover mandatory and specialist requirements. Having   a   Certificate   of      Education   from   Portsmouth   University,   also   Level   4   NVQ in   Training   and   Development   our   courses   reflect   the   mandatory   and   specialised training that may be needed. All courses provide an opportunity for learners involvement with a self assessment before and after the  session which helps identify positive outcomes.
Note 1

Risk Assessments

Management

Policies

Training

Requirement As part of managing health and safety of a business there must be control of the risks in the workplace. To achieve this there is a need to identify what might cause harm to people and decide whether there has been reasonable steps to prevent that harm. This is known as risk assessment and it is something required by law to be carried out. If you have fewer than five employees, you don't have to write anything down. Even though you may be already taking steps to protect your employees, a risk assessment will help decide whether you have covered all you need to. For some risks, other regulations require particular control measures. An assessment can help you identify where you need to look at certain risks and any additional control measures in more detail. Solution A risk assessment completed by AHSS will follow the 5 Step methodology, as required by the Health and Safety Executive, and on completion will provide a detailed report with an Action Plan highlighting any areas requiring attention. 1. Identifying any hazards 2. Advise who might be harmed and how 3. Provide an evaluation of the risks and recommend precautions 4. Record the significant findings 5. Recommend when a review is required
Requirement Organisations   have   a   legal   duty,   defined   by   the   ‘The   Management   of   Health   and   Safety at   Work   Regulations   1999’,   to   put   in   place   suitable   arrangements   to   manage   health   and safety by the control of health and safety risks. In   implementing   arrangements,   organisations   should   consult   with   employees   or   their representatives, including trade unions where they are recognised. The    ‘suitable    arrangements’    are    defined    as    a    minimum    having    the    processes    and procedures required to meet the legal requirements. These include; a written health and safety policy (if you employ five or more people); assessments   of   the   risks   to   employees,   contractors,   customers,   partners,   and any   other   people   who   could   be   affected   by   your   activities   –   and   record   the significant   findings   in   writing   (if   you   employ   five   or   more   people).   Any   risk assessment must be ‘suitable and sufficient’; arrangements   for   the   effective   planning,   organisation,   control,   monitoring   and review    of    the    preventive    and    protective    measures    that    come    from    risk assessment; access to competent health and safety advice. (AHSS at your service.) providing   employees   with   information   about   the   risks   in   your   workplace   and how they are protected;  instruction and training for employees in how to deal with the risks;  ensuring there is adequate and appropriate supervision in place; consulting   with   employees   about   their   risks   at   work   and   current   preventive   and protective measures Solution This        ‘Plan,    Do,    Check,    Act’    model    achieves    a    balance    between    the    systems    and behavioural   aspects   of   management.   It   also   treats   health   and   safety   management   as   an integral part of good management generally, rather than as a stand-alone system. With   the   partnership   of   AHSS   and   using   the   model   approach   for   managing   health   and safety     all     legal     requirements     are     identified     and          ensure     appropriate     suitable arrangements made. AHSS    has    provided    this    service    for    over    ten    years    with    numerous    Public    and Commercial organisations.
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999:  Require employers to carry out risk assessments, make arrangements to implement necessary measures, appoint competent people and arrange for appropriate information and training. Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992: Cover a wide range of basic health, safety and welfare issues such as ventilation, heating, lighting, workstations, seating and welfare facilities. Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992:  Set out requirements for work with Visual Display Units (VDUs) Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992: Require employers to provide appropriate protective clothing and equipment for their employees. Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998:  Require that equipment provided for use at work, including machinery, is safe. Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992:  Cover the moving of objects by hand or bodily force. Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981:  Cover requirements for first aid. The Health and Safety Information for Employees Regulations 1989: Require employers to display a poster telling employees what they need to know about health and safety. Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act 1969:  Require employers to take out insurance against accidents and ill health to their employees. Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995: Require employers to notify certain occupational injuries, diseases and dangerous events.  Noise at Work Regulations 1989: Require employers to take action to protect employees from hearing damage.  Electricity at Work Regulations 1989: Require people in control of electrical systems to ensure they are safe to use and maintained in a safe condition. Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002: Require employers to assess the risks from hazardous substances and take appropriate precautions. In addition, specific regulations cover particular areas, for example asbestos and lead, and: Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 2002: Require suppliers to classify, label and package dangerous chemicals and provide safety data sheets for them. Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994: Cover safe systems of work on construction sites.  Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1994:  Cover safe installation, maintenance and use of gas systems and appliances in domestic and commercial premises. Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1999:  Require those who manufacture, store or transport dangerous chemicals or explosives in certain quantities to notify the relevant authority.  Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002:  Require employers and the self employed to carry out a risk assessment of work activities involving dangerous substances.
Requirement The   first   requirement   of   management   under   the   ‘Plan,   Do,   Check,   Act’   methodology   is having   a   strategy   and   making   clear   plans   how   to   achieve   effective   health   and   safety outcomes. Policies   will   set   a   clear   direction   for   the   organisation   to   follow   and   should   be   shared throughout   the   workforce,   so   that   everyone   understands   how   health   and   safety   will   be managed.   If   your   organisation   has   five   or   more   employees,   that   policy   must   be   written down. The   number   and   types   of   Policies   that   an   organisation   requires   depends   on   the   type   of activity   their   workers   are   engaged   in.   Policies   must   cover   the   requirements   of   relevant Regulations. See Note 1 for a list of 18 Regulations that may be required. All   policies   should   be   written   in   consultation   with   the   workforce      and   must   be   signed   by a   person   at   the   top   of   the   organisation   –   the   owner   or   a   director.   Most   importantly, organisations   should   ensure   that   their   actions,   and   those   of   your   workers,   mirror   the statements that have been made. Solution AHSS    have    templates,    that    cover    the    Regulations.    which    after    consultation    can    be adaptable to make bespoke policies.
ARUN HEALTH SAFETY SERVICES
Note 1
Requirement
To   comply   with   the   law,   employees   need   to   have   the   skills,   knowledge   and   experience to   carry   out   their   duties   safely.   Organisations   should   take   into   account   their   employees’ capabilities,   to   ensure   the   demands   of   the   job   do   not   exceed   their   ability   to   do   the work without risk to themselves or others. Everyone    in    an    organisation    requires    adequate    health    and    safety    training.    Training helps   people   gain   the   skills   and   knowledge,   and   ultimately   the   competence,   to   carry out their work safely and without risk to their health. Employees   must   be   given   information   about   the   risks   involved   in   their   work,   and   the steps    that    need    to    be    taken    to    reduce    or    remove    those    risks.    Where    training    is particularly    important    There    are    situations    where    health    and    safety    training    is particularly important, for example: when people are new to the job; on exposure to new or increased risks; where existing skills may have become rusty or need updating.
Solution
With   years   of   experience   training   and   teaching   AHSS   can   provide   courses   suitable   to cover mandatory and specialist requirements. Having   a   Certificate   of      Education   from   Portsmouth   University,   also   Level   4   NVQ   in Training   and   Development   our   courses   reflect   the   mandatory   and   specialised   training that may be needed. All courses provide an opportunity for learners involvement with a self assessment before and after the  session which helps identify positive outcomes.